Art in Public Places

In 2009, the Art in Public Places Commission celebrated its 50th installation in the twenty years since City Council passed the 1% Ordinance allowing for public artwork in the City. The diverse collection of public artwork appears in all areas of town, and includes media from bronze and stone to fabric, glass and photography. The collection continues to grow each year. Maps and brochures regarding the collection are available at the Longmont Museum (400 Quail Road) as well as other City facilities. 

Artworks from permanent collection located in the Longmont Creative District

Early Longmont by Gregg LeFevre, 1996

This 5' by 7' bronze map of Longmont's original square mile illustrates important events, building and features from the early years of the town's history. The artwork was commissioned in celebration of Longmont's 125th anniversary. Old St. Stephen's Church, 470 Main Street.

Bicycle Racks by the Children of Longmont, 2005 

The 20 functional bicycle racks sprinkled throughout the downtown area were designed and painted by the children of Longmont to provide artistic and functional bicycle parking for those who choose to use bicycles to get around in the Longmont community. Various locations.

Roosevelt – the Conservationist by Dan Snarr, 2004 

Teddy Roosevelt visited Longmont in 1900 and this life sized bronze is a reminder of this historic event. Longs Peak and Coffman streets.

Sister Cities Goose by Beau Townsend and Lory Ohs, 2002 

One of the Geese from the Geese Galore! project has joined the AIPP collection. Sister Cities Goose exhibits the relationship between Longmont and our two Sister Cities, Chino, Japan and Guzman, Mexico. Inside the Civic Center, 350 Kimbark St.

How We Live and What We Live For by Barbara Jo Revelle, 1993 

This thirty-five foot tall, computer-generated, ceramic tile mural displays attributes valued by Longmont's founders. Safety and Justice Center, 225 Kimbark St.

Longmont 1871-1910 by George Greenamyer, 1993 

Greenamyer's library portal of painted steel commemorates the founding people and events of the City of Longmont. Longmont Public Library, Fourth Avenue and Kimbark Street.

Los Arcos de Longmont by Armando Alvarez, 2001 

The six breezeways connect Main Street to the parking lots downtown each has a double facade of colorful steel with designs of Byzantine glass tile inlaid throughout. Main Street and Kimbark Street parking areas between Third and Sixth avenues.

Brick Sculpture by Ken Williams, 1992 

This abstract, biomorphic artwork echoes the buildings of downtown Longmont through its vertical posture and traditional brickwork. Sixth Avenue and Main Street.

Colorful Poetry In The Middle Pages by Louise Kodis, 1994 

Kodis colorful array of mixed-media banners are balanced explosions of shapes and colors. Civic Center Complex, 350 Kimbark St.